Alumnae, Girls

How to Highlight Your Girl Scout Experience on Your Resume: Girl Member Edition

Girl Scouts across the country are accomplishing amazing things. From tutoring students who live below the poverty line to creating a theatre education program, there is no shortage of impressive Girl Scout projects.

So, once you’ve graduated and start looking for jobs and internships, how can you highlight your Girl Scout experience on your resume? There are actually quite a few ways!

Highlight your Highest Award projects.

It’s no secret that Girl Scout Highest Award projects are really impressive. All three awards give you the chance to do big things while working on an issue you care about. Plus, you’re changing your corner of the world—and maybe even beyond! So, how can you utilize the amazing things you accomplished as a Highest Award recipient on your resume?

First, start with your LinkedIn profile. Because you’ve got virtually endless space, LinkedIn is a great place to gather everything you want to showcase to potential employers. To do this, go to your LinkedIn profile and click on Add new profile section > Accomplishments > Honors and Awards.

Once you’ve added your Highest Awards to LinkedIn, switch over to your resume. Employers loving seeing impressive community service projects, and Highest Awards are a great example! You can create a section on your resume that’s specific to community service, or you can combine it with Work Experience and change the title to simply Experience.

Keep in mind that your resume should be a single page of the most relevant experience possible. So, if you’ve got too much information for one page, cut whatever is the least relevant to the job you’re applying for. That doesn’t mean automatically cutting any extracurriculars! It’s very possible that your Highest Award is one of the most relevant pieces of experience on your resume.

For example, if your Gold Award Project involved clearing a new trail for public use in your area, that would be an awesome thing to include on your resume when applying to jobs with the National Park Service.

This is especially true if you’re in college or just recently graduated — relevant and recent is an amazing combination!

Include the skills you learned as a Girl Scout.

Resumes often include a section highlighting the applicant’s skill set. So, what do you do if you’re not really sure what to include there? Pull out your Girl Scout vest or sash!

What badges did you earn as a Girl Scout? Use those as reminders of all of the awesome skills you’ve learned over the years.

Sure, the computer skills you learned as a Girl Scout may be a little outdated now, even if it was only five years ago. But seeing the badge may remind you of all of the computer skills you have that aren’t outdated!

Add in any positions you’ve held within Girl Scouts.

What positions — paid and unpaid — have you held within Girl Scouts? Were you part of the CSA Association? Maybe you were in charge of the social media promotion of the CSA conference. Then you did social media marketing – include that experience on your resume!

Or maybe you completed your CIT I & II training for camp. That’s really impressive! What leadership skills translate to the job you’re applying for? Make sure you’re including those as well.

It doesn’t matter if these positions were paid or not. You still got valuable experience that will be relevant to your employer, so make sure you’re including these things as you’re applying for jobs.


With how much we see Girl Scouts accomplishing each and every day, we wouldn’t be surprised if you can fill your entire resume with only Girl Scout experience. So don’t forget all of these valuable skills as you’re applying for internships and jobs! You never know what will catch your future employer’s eye.

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