Girl Scouts of Western Ohio Blog

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Patch Programs

Badges, Activities, & Beyond

4 Patch Programs to Explore in 2024

Girl Scouts of Western Ohio (GSWO) has several patch programs that girls can complete to commemorate fun moments, signify participation in an activity, and earn special insignia to attach to their uniforms. Patch programs are a great way to share a unique and tailored learning experience with Girl Scouts, especially one that highlights a topic not yet covered by badge options. What is the difference between patches and badges? Badges are official Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) insignia  ...

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Badges, Activities, & Beyond

Celebrate Black History Month with Girl Scouts!

Black History Month is the perfect time to reflect on the importance of Black voices in our community! The origins of Black History Month date back to 1926 when Harvard-trained historian Carter G. Woodson founded “National Negro History Week.” In 1928, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History began assigning a Black History Month theme to highlight the different aspects of the Black experience every year. With this in mind, 2023’s theme of Black Resistance focuses  ...

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Badges, Activities, & Beyond

Helpful Tips to Boost Your Mental Wellness

May is Mental Health Awareness Month! In an effort to raise awareness, fight the stigmas that come with mental health issues, and encourage building wellness skills, Girl Scouts of the USA has released Girl Scout Wellness Activities—and a special patch! At Girl Scouts of Western Ohio, we are working to connect girls to the resources and skills they need to be resilient, ready, and strong when they experience big emotions or know someone who is struggling with mental health. On May 3, we  ...

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Badges, Activities, & Beyond

Celebrate Black History Month with a New Patch Program

The History of Black History Month Black History Month was created to celebrate and remember important people, accomplishments, and heritage. It was first thought of by Carter G. Woodson in 1926. Originally, it was only celebrated for one week and the focus was to teach Black history in public schools. Woodson titled it “Negro History Week.” Woodson chose February to be the time of the celebration because Fredrick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln were both born in February. These men played  ...

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